Nova Scotia

The most well-known region of Nova Scotia is undoubtedly Cape Breton Island and its world famous Cabot Trail. The incredibly scenic roadway is deemed as one of ‘The World’s Most Beautiful Drives’, popular with international tourists as well as experienced cyclists. The island itself, considered one of the world’s must-see islands, provides the perfect backdrop for outdoor activities such as hiking, cycling, kayaking, whale and bird watching.

But that’s just the island! The Nova Scotia Peninsula boasts its own endless opportunities for exploration.

The South Shore, west of Halifax, is spotted with lighthouses (including the postcard perfect Peggy’s Cove), beaches, sea caves, coastal cliffs, and charming seaside hamlets serving up some of the best seafood the Maritimes have to offer.

This is also where you’ll find the picturesque town of Lunenburg – A designated UNESCO World Heritage site and home to the famous Bluenose, featured on the Canadian dime.

Further west, Kejimkujik National Park Seaside is a wild and isolated 22 km² stretch of coastline characterized by glacier-carved headlands, secluded rocky coves and broad sweeps of silver sand.

To the north, enjoy Annapolis Valley wineries, succulent sea scallops in Digby, and coastal hiking and whale watching in the Bay of Fundy.

 

Spring is comfortable with rainfall highest in April. Early May to mid June is alive with colour and temperatures usually range from 10 to 22 degrees C (50 to 71 degrees F).

Summer is hot, but rarely humid. Daytime temperatures from mid June to mid September are usually from 20 to 25 C (70 to 80 degrees F).

Autumn is clear and bright. September and October afternoons can be quite warm, evenings cool. Temperatures range from 8 to 20 degrees C (46 to 70 degrees F).

Winter is crisp and clean. Temperatures from late November to mid March usually range from -15 to 0 degrees C (5 to 32 degrees F).

We recommend visiting Environment Canada’s website for information specific to the region in which you are travelling.